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But as more police agencies join with the company known as Ring, the partnerships are raising privacy concerns. Critics complain that the systems turn neighborhoods into places of constant surveillance and create suspicion that falls heavier on minorities. Police say the cameras can serve as a digital neighborhood watch. Critics also say Ring, a subsidiary of Amazon, appears to be marketing its cameras by stirring up fear of crime at a time when it's decreasing. Amazon's promotional videos show people lurking around homes, and the company recently posted a job opening for a managing news editor to "deliver breaking crime news alerts to our neighbors. ""Amazon is profiting off of fear," said Chris Gilliard, an English professor at Michigan's Macomb Community College and a prominent critic of Ring and other technology that he says can reinforce race barriers. Part of the strategy seems to be selling the cameras "where the fear of crime is more real than the actual existence of crime. "The cameras offer a wide view from wherever they are positioned. Homeowners get phone alerts with streaming video if the doorbell rings or the device's heat sensors detect a person or a passing car. Ring's basic doorbell sells for $99, with recurring charges starting at $3 a month for users who want footage stored. Ring says it stores the recordings for two months.

home security monitoring services

01.14.2007 | 34 Comments

Don't forget basic security measuresA security system helps protect your home, but it can also create a false sense of security that might lead you to be less careful. Make sure you're following these precautions:Lock all doors and windows when you're out of the house. In about 40 percent of break ins to unoccupied homes, offenders gained access through an unlocked door or window, the Bureau of Justice Statistics reports. Display security system yard and window signs. These signs can scare off burglars. Keep the lights on when you're not there.

alarm systems house

01.14.2007 | 16 Comments

In Britain this is happening and across Europe they are following suit. In North America this trend seems to be a bit more sluggish but many are saying that it will only be a matter of time before it starts to take off. This trend has been given a quick start by the present economic crisis and families are doing this in order to cope. What we will probably see is a change in what we call the family. Whereas before now society used to consider a family as consisting of primarily parents and children, now we are going to see an extension to this family of an inclusion of grandparents. The Eastern countries have been doing this for years now and now it is the turn of the Western countries. On a cultural level, Eastern countries may be more ready and prepared to accept this growing trend and European countries may not be too far behind but for the British it may take a bit of a learning curve for all stakeholders to get used to. In the case of North Americans, only time will tell. Whatever the outcome, this trend probably has the potential to live for at least the next decade and it would be interesting to see how the marketing and advertising industries deal with this. I am going to leave you with a fascinating reference to check out. One that paints the picture for the reader in Britain.